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Barolo Wines

A prestigious appellation located in Piedmont, Italy, Barolo is the birthplace of exceptional wines. This appellation covers an area of 1,500 hectares spread over 11 municipalities, including...Read More

Products (142)
RP
89
JR
16
Brezza : Sarmassa 2011
HK$2,914 
HK$485.67 / Unit
RP
93
WS
93
JS
95
Chiara Boschis : Via Nuova 2015
HK$3,885 
HK$647.50 / Unit
RP
92
JR
15.5+
WS
92
Marchesi di Barolo : Cannubi 2011
HK$3,053 
HK$508.83 / Unit
RP
93
JR
17
Brezza : Castellero 2016
HK$2,636 
HK$439.33 / Unit
RP
92
JR
16.5+
WS
93
Chiara Boschis : Via Nuova 2011
HK$3,839 
HK$639.83 / Unit
RP
89
JS
91
Chiara Boschis : Mosconi 2009
HK$4,163 
HK$693.83 / Unit
RP
93
Marchesi di Barolo : Barolo Sarmassa Limited Edition 10 years 2010
HK$5,550 
HK$925 / Unit
RP
91
JS
95
Domenico Clerico : Pajana 2008
HK$4,070 
HK$678.33 / Unit
Brezza : Castellero 2015
HK$2,359 
HK$393.17 / Unit
RP
94+
JR
16.5
JS
96
Roberto Voerzio : La Serra 2010
Wines of the world at light prices
HK$12,256
HK$11,035 
HK$1,839.17 / Unit
Rocche dei Manzoni : Vigna Cappella di Santo Stefano 2016
HK$5,550 
HK$925 / Unit
JR
16++
Domenico Clerico : Barolo 2017
HK$2,220 
HK$370 / Unit
RP
90
JR
16,5
Brezza : Sarmassa 2015
HK$2,868 
HK$478 / Unit
Domenico Clerico : Percristina 2011
HK$9,713 
HK$1,618.83 / Unit
Borgogno : Fossati 2016
Wines of the world at light prices
HK$3,700
HK$3,515 
HK$585.83 / Unit
RP
92
JS
93
Domenico Clerico : Ciabot Mentin 2008
HK$3,885 
HK$647.50 / Unit
RP
92
JR
17.5
JS
95
Marchesi di Barolo : Cannubi 2016
Wines of the world at light prices
HK$3,330
HK$3,164 
HK$527.33 / Unit
RP
94
Borgogno : Cannubi 2016
HK$5,550 
HK$925 / Unit
RP
90
JR
16.5
WS
91
Cordero di Montezemolo : Bricco Gattera 2011
HK$3,469 
HK$578.17 / Unit
Elio Altare : Arborina 2017
HK$5,041 
HK$840.17 / Unit
Brezza : Barolo 2015
Wines of the world at light prices
HK$1,841
HK$1,656 
HK$276 / Unit
RP
91
JR
16
WS
87
Antinori - Prunotto : Barolo 2010
HK$2,775 
HK$462.50 / Unit
JS
94
Antinori - Prunotto : Bussia 2016
Wines of the world at light prices
HK$4,486
HK$4,042 
HK$673.67 / Unit
RP
89
WS
79
Marchesi di Barolo : Riserva 2006
HK$2,821 
HK$470.17 / Unit
Elio Altare : Barolo 2017
HK$3,746 
HK$624.33 / Unit
RP
91?
JR
17.5
WS
88
Elio Altare : Arborina 2015
HK$4,903 
HK$817.17 / Unit
RP
90
JR
15
WS
92
Marchesi di Barolo : Cannubi 2012
HK$3,006 
HK$501 / Unit
RP
93
JR
17.5
WS
91
Michele Chiarlo : Cerequio 2011
Wines of the world at light prices
HK$4,255
HK$3,830 
HK$638.33 / Unit
RP
92
JR
16
WS
91
Marchesi di Barolo : Sarmassa 2011
HK$3,238 
HK$539.67 / Unit
RP
92
JS
96
Marchesi di Barolo : Sarmassa 2016
HK$3,330 
HK$555 / Unit
RP
94
WS
95
Conterno Fantino : Barolo Mosconi "Vigna Ped" 2015
HK$3,700 
HK$616.67 / Unit
RP
94
JR
17.5
WS
93
Roberto Voerzio : Cerequio 2009
Wines of the world at light prices
HK$9,898
HK$8,908 
HK$1,484.67 / Unit
RP
93
WS
92
JS
94
Marchesi di Barolo : Sarmassa 2015
HK$3,238 
HK$539.67 / Unit
RP
94+
WS
92
JS
96
Borgogno : Cannubi 2008
Wines of the world at light prices
HK$5,828
HK$4,958 
HK$826.33 / Unit
WS
92
Borgogno : Cannubi 2009
HK$5,411 
HK$901.83 / Unit
JR
17
Brezza : Cannubi 2015
Wines of the world at light prices
HK$2,775
HK$2,498 
HK$416.33 / Unit
RP
96
JR
16.5
WS
94
Roberto Voerzio : Rocche dell'Annunziata Torriglione 2010
HK$12,256
HK$11,035 
HK$1,839.17 / Unit
Borgogno : Riserva 1999
HK$11,655 
HK$1,942.50 / Unit
RP
95
WS
90
Domenico Clerico : Ciabot Mentin 2012
HK$4,070 
HK$678.33 / Unit
RP
90
JR
16.5
Brezza : Bricco Sarmassa 2015
Wines of the world at light prices
HK$3,885
HK$3,691 
HK$615.17 / Unit
RP
89
JR
17
Brezza : Cannubi 2011
Wines of the world at light prices
HK$2,636
HK$2,238 
HK$373 / Unit
Rocche dei Manzoni : Vigna Cappella di Santo Stefano 2015
HK$5,504
HK$4,958 
HK$826.33 / Unit
RP
86
JR
16.5
Brezza : Cannubi 2014
HK$2,266 
HK$377.67 / Unit
RP
91
JR
17++
JS
94
Cordero di Montezemolo : Enrico VI 2012
HK$4,301 
HK$716.83 / Unit
RP
87
JR
17
Brezza : Cannubi 2012
HK$2,359 
HK$393.17 / Unit

Barolo Wines: Bold, Fragrant Nebbiolo from Piedmont

Barolo wines

Hailing from the vineyard-draped, foggy hills of Langhe in the Piedmont region of north-western Italy, Barolo is one of the most beloved of Italian wines, and one of the very first to earn the prestigious DOCG title. It is here that thin-skinned, late-ripening Nebbiolo finds its purest and most classic expression, producing remarkably long-lived and complex wines with an elevated acidity, firm tannic structure and tell-tale aromas of rose and tar. This combination of a bold palate and a delicate nose make Barolo wines the ideal pairing to wintertime comfort foods that are rich in texture but mild in flavour. Pair them with a hearty wild mushroom risotto or handmade tagliatelle al ragu on a cosy night in.

 

The History of Barolo: King of Wines and Wine of Kings

While Nebbiolo, the flagship grape variety of the Piedmont region in the north-western corner of Italy, has been around since at least the 13th century, the history of modern-day Barolo is relatively short. Some wine historians believe that up until the 19th century, Barolo was actually a sweet wine. Nebbiolo is a famously late-ripening varietal, historically harvested in late October or early November, meaning that by November and December, temperatures in Piedmont would be cold enough to stop alcoholic fermentation, resulting in plenty of residual sugar remaining in the wine. It was a 19th century politician by the name of Camillo Benso, Count of Cavour who took the first stand in improving the quality of wines from Barolo. Having travelled to Bordeaux and Burgundy, he was inspired to improve the winemaking technique at his family’s estate in Grinzane and hired French winemaker Louis Oudart to help him do so.

Oudart made several changes both in the vineyards and cellar of the Count of Cavour. He limited grape yield to improve overall quality, cleaned the cellars, installed new equipment and – perhaps most importantly – heated the fermentation area to allow fermentation to proceed without stopping, producing a dry wine. Oudart is believed to have made the same changes in the cellars of the Marchesa di Barolo, whose wines caught the attention of King Carlo Alberto of Savoy and later King Victor Emmanuel. The latter enjoyed the wines so much, in fact, that they planted Barolo vineyards themselves, giving rise to the popular nickname “King of Wines, Wine of Kings.”

 

Barolo winemaking
© Oddero

 

Another popular theory claims that it was not a French winemaker, but an Italian by the name of Paolo Francesco Staglieno who first produced the modern dry version of Barolo while working for the Count of Cavour between 1836 and 1841. His method, coined “the Staglieno method,” is believed to have already been widely in use by the time Oudart arrived to Italy. Whatever version is true, Barolo wine became dry in the mid-19th century and by the mid-20th century several large negociants (wine merchants) were purchasing grapes and wines from winegrowers across the zone to blend into their house style. In the 1960’s, several individual property owners began popping up and shifting the focus from vineyard blends to single-vineyard bottlings. The Barolo DOC was established in 1966 and upgraded to DOCG status in 1980.

In the 1970’s and 1980’s, the world wine market began showing a preference for fruitier, less tannic wines that were accessible at an earlier age, and to meet this demand a group of rebellious Barolo producers started producing a more modern, international style of Barolo. Producers like Elio Altare adopted certain techniques to “soften” the wines, including harvesting later to ensure more developed tannins, shorter periods of maceration and fermentation, the use of rotofermenters for a speedier extraction of colour, a shorter maturation period in small new French oak barriques (rather than the traditional large Slavonian ask casks called botti) and a shorter period of bottle age before release. These producers, labelled “modernists” were scorned by traditionalist producers, determined to stick to tried-and-true methods. This rift between Barolo producers is known as the Barolo Wars.

 

Barolo barrels; Barolo winemaking
© Chiara Boschis

 

In the last few decades, advances in viticulture and winemaking have helped bridge the gap between modernist and traditionalist Barolo producers, allowing for a “best of both worlds.” Improvements in canopy management, for example, has resulted in the harvest of riper grapes with more developed tannins at earlier dates. Temperature-controlled fermentation vessels have led to significant improvements in quality in both camps. And while many of today’s Barolo producers opt for some combination of traditional and modern techniques, some distinctions still remain: the modern approach continues to favour shorter maceration and cooler fermentation temperatures than the traditional approach, as well as ageing in small new French oak barriques rather than large botti.

 

The Barolo Terroir: Heartland of Nebbiolo

Barolo is situated in the north-western area of Piedmont of Italy, southwest of Barbaresco, in the fog-prone Langhe Hills. The Barolo DOCG appellation is made up of 11 different communes, of which the “Big Five” (Barolo, La Mora, Monforte d’Alba, Serralunga d’Alba and Castiglione Faletto) produce a grand majority of the wine, while the remaining six (Novello, Diano d’Alba, Verduno, Roddi, Grinzane Cavour and Cherasco, Roddi) supply the rest. Each of these villages has its own signature style of Barolo wine, with Cartiglione Falletto producing wines with powerful tannins, for example, while Monforte d’Alba producing a silkier, smoother style.

These differences depend largely on terroir, as the Barolo zone is home to a wide variety of mesoclimates, soil types, expositions and altitudes, all of which significantly influence how the Nebbiolo grape develops. For example, the Helvetian sand and limestone soils of the Serralunga Valley (home to Castiglione Falletto, Monforte d’Alba and Serralunga d’Alba) produce more intense wines with longer ageing potential, the more calcareous marl soils in the Central Valley (home to Barolo and La Morra) produce wines that are typically softer and fruiter in profile. And even within the Central Valley there are differences between La Morra wines, which are more perfumed and graceful, and Barolo-commune Barolo, which tend to be more complex and broad in texture. Overall, the Barolo appellation enjoys a continental climate, with temperatures moderated by the Tanaro River and its tributaries.

 

Barolo vineyard
© Domenico Clerico

 

Barolo is the heartland of Nebbiolo, a small, thin-skinned red grape variety naturally high in acid and tannins. While Nebbiolo is one of the first varieties in the Piedmontese wine regions to undergo bud-break in the spring, it is also one of the last to be picked (in late October or November), due to its very slow ripening. It is believed to get its name from “nebbia,” which in Italian refer to the fogs that drape the Langhe Hills in the autumn, slowing down even further the ripening of the grapes. The Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Grantita (DOCG) Barolo is the highest classification for Italian wines, and comes with several restrictions on the winemaking process. Barolo DOCG wines must be made from 100% Nebbiolo and aged for at least 38 months, of which 18 in oak. When a Barolo has been aged for five years or more, it may be labelled Riserva.

 

Barolo in the Glass, Barolo with Food

Barolo wines are full-bodied red wines, which tend to be high in natural acidity, with dense and firm tannins that evolve over decades in the bottle. Over time, its youthful ruby-red colour evolves a beautiful rusty, brick-red tinge. On the nose, Barolo wines express the tell-tale aromas of Nebbiolo: its signature “rose and tar,” dry herbs and liquorice, as well as red fruits (raspberry and cherry). Barolo wines from the best vintages can be aged for 30 years or more in the bottle, significantly improving with time in bottle. With age, these wines reveal earthy nuances of truffles, forest floor and dark chocolate.

 

Barolo
© Chiara Boschis

 

Before serving a younger Barolo red wine (7 to 10 years old), it is advisable to decant it for around 4 hours. For an older Barolo red wines (25 years or more), it is best to open the bottle and let it sit for up to a day to allow the residue to sink to the bottom and then decant it by pouring the wine slowly and carefully into the decanter. Barolo should ideally be served at temperatures of 64°F to 68°F (18°C to 20°C).

As a wine naturally high in acid and tannin, Barolo is a fantastic red wine to pair with food. Its powerful tannic structure and delicate floral aromas make it especially well-suited to dishes which are subtle in flavour but rich in texture, wintertime classics like wild mushroom risotto, homemade pasta with a rich, meaty ragu or roasted game. A bottle of Barolo is the perfect centrepiece for a big family dinner, but hits the spot equally well as a wine to open with your special someone on a cosy night in.

 

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